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What Does Adderall Look Like?

Published on April 27, 2021
What Does Adderall Look Like? | Adderall Pills, Dosage, & Images

Adderall is the brand name for a prescription stimulant drug that consists of two central nervous system stimulants: amphetamine salt and dextroamphetamine salt. 

The drug boosts energy and alertness by increasing the effects of the neurotransmitters (brain chemicals) dopamine and norepinephrine. 

It’s used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a sleep disorder called narcolepsy. Side effects of Adderall may include dry mouth, weight loss, increased heart rate, and high blood pressure. 

Some people abuse Adderall to increase energy, lose weight, or feel “high.” If you suspect that someone you love is abusing Adderall, it’s important to know what the drug looks like. 

What Does Adderall Look Like?

The appearance of Adderall depends on the type, dosage, and manufacturer

Like many other prescription drugs, Adderall comes in two types: immediate-release and extended-release. 

According to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the effects of immediate-release Adderall start quickly and last four to six hours, while the effects of extended-release Adderall (also called Adderall XR) start more slowly and last up to ten hours. 

The most common forms of immediate-release Adderall are:

  • a 5mg white, round pill with “AD” or “dp” stamped on one side and “5” on the other side
  • a 7.5mg blue, oval pill with “AD” or “dp” stamped on one side and “7.5” on the other side
  • a 10mg blue, round pill with “AD” or “dp” stamped on one side and “10” on the other side
  • a 12.5mg peach, round pill with “dp” stamped on one side and “12.5” on the other side
  • a 15mg peach, oval pill with “dp” stamped on one side and “15” on the other side
  • a 15mg orange, oval pill with “AD” stamped on one side and “15” on the other side
  • a 20mg peach, round pill with “dp” stamped on one side and “20” on the other side
  • a 20mg orange, round pill with “AD” stamped on one side and “20” on the other side
  • a 30mg peach, round pill with “dp” stamped on one side and “30” on the other side
  • a 30mg orange, round pill with “AD” stamped on one side and “30” on the other side

The most common forms of extended-release Adderall are:

  • a 5mg blue capsule with “Adderall XR” stamped on one end and “5mg” on the other end
  • a 10mg blue capsule with “Adderall XR” stamped on one end and “10mg” on the other end
  • a 10mg blue capsule with “SHIRE 381” stamped on one end and “10mg” on the other end
  • a 15mg blue and white capsule with “Adderall XR” stamped on one end and “15mg” on the other end
  • a 20mg orange capsule with “Adderall XR” stamped on one end and “20mg” on the other end
  • a 20mg orange capsule with “SHIRE 381” stamped on one end and “20mg” on the other end
  • a 25mg orange and white capsule with “Adderall XR” stamped on one end and “25mg” on the other end
  • a 30mg orange capsule with “SHIRE 381” stamped on one end and “30mg” on the other end
  • a 30mg orange capsule with “Adderall XR” stamped on one end and “30mg” on the other end

What Does Fake Adderall Look Like?

Fake Adderall usually looks just like real Adderall. That’s because drug dealers can use devices called pill presses to press any substance into the form of an Adderall pill. Pressed Adderall often contains highly dangerous drugs, including methamphetamine and fentanyl.

Methamphetamine, or meth, is an amphetamine like Adderall. However, it’s much more powerful. It can cause serious health problems such as psychosis (a feeling of disconnection from reality), heart problems (including heart attack), permanent brain damage, and severe addiction.

Fentanyl is an extremely powerful and addictive opioid that’s responsible for numerous overdose deaths. 

To avoid accidentally ingesting meth, fentanyl, or other dangerous substances, never purchase Adderall illegally. 

Adderall Health Risks

The United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies Adderall as a Schedule II controlled substance. That means it has a high potential of abuse and addiction. 

Adderall abuse occurs when you take Adderall without following your health care provider’s medical advice. For example, you might take it more frequently than prescribed, take a higher dose than prescribed, take it without a prescription, or crush the pills and snort them. 

Over time, Adderall abuse can lead to addiction, a disease that makes you feel unable to stop using Adderall despite wanting to.

If you’re concerned about your or your loved one’s use of Adderall, please contact an Ark Behavioral Health specialist. 

We offer inpatient and outpatient substance abuse treatment programs that include mental health counseling, medical detox, and other recovery-focused services.

Written by Ark Behavioral Health Editorial Team
This page does not provide medical advice.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Fentanyl
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - Know the Risks of Meth
United States Food and Drug Administration - Adderall XR Label
United States National Library of Medicine - Dextroamphetamine and Amphetamine

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